Current Articles


New approaches to VLP-based vaccines

Vaccination is a long and established field of research, and outputs from the research have saved countless millions of lives. The early vaccines were developed with scant regard for the immunological mechanisms at play, largely because they were unknown. We are now in a position to use our knowledge of immunology to rationally design vaccines. This article focusses on the use of virus-like particles (VLPs) as vaccines.

Alekhya Penumarthi and Peter M Smooker     24-Mar-2017
Bioaugmentation: an effective commercial technology for the removal of phenols from wastewater

Phenol represents a huge problem in industrial wastewater effluents and needs to be removed due to its toxic and carcinogenic nature. The removal of phenol from the wastewater is often both expensive and time consuming; there is therefore a requirement for a more effective, sustainable solution for the removal of phenol from wastewaters. Bioaugmentation or the addition of phenol degrading microorganisms to contaminated effluents is one such sustainable approach being considered. Here, we describe how bioaugmentation has been applied for the bio...

Gregory Poi, Esmaeil Shahsavari, Arturo Aburto-Medina and Andrew S Ball     24-Mar-2017
Influenza vaccine production technologies: past, present and future

Influenza is a constantly evolving global health threat that leads to substantial morbidity and mortality particularly in vulnerable populations at either end of the age spectrum. Society has responded by creating a global public-private system that involves constant surveillance, candidate virus generation, and release reagent generation linked to worldwide influenza vaccine manufacturing capabilities. It was initially recognised that influenza circulates as multiple antigenically distinct subtypes, which led to the generation of vaccines cont...

Yingxia Wen and Ethan C Settembre     21-Mar-2017
Hacking nature: genetic tools for reprograming enzymes

Enzymes have many modern industrial applications, from biomass decomposition in the production of biofuels to highly stereospecific biotransformations in pharmaceutical manufacture. The capacity to find or engineer enzymes with activities pertinent to specific applications has been essential for the growth of a multibillion dollar enzyme industry. Over the course of the past 50–60 years our capacity to address this issue has become increasingly sophisticated, supported by innumerable advances, from early discoveries such as the co-linear...

Carol J Hartley, Matthew Wilding and Colin Scott     22-Mar-2017
Yeast as a model organism for the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries

Considerable knowledge about how we function has come through the use of the unicellular microbe yeast. Yeasts are eukaryotes like us and the similarity between us and yeasts is readily visible at the molecular level. This places yeast as an important tool for industries involved in health research, including pharmaceutical and nutraceutical discovery.

Ian Macreadie     15-Mar-2017
Mammalian cell cultures

There is increasing demand worldwide for high-quality complex proteins for treating diseases and for clinical and pre-clinical studies involving recombinant proteins, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies, many of which are the products of mammalian cell cultures. Biologics or protein-based drugs had a global market over US$200 billion in 2016, with eight of the top 10 selling drugs with a combined global sales over US$55 billion produced using mammalian cell cultures1,2. Recombinant proteins are also significant ...

George Lovrecz     22-Mar-2017

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Guide to Mosquitoes of Australia

Guide to Mosquitoes of Australia

Provides a comprehensive, user-friendly guide to the mosquitoes of Australia and key strategies for managing them.

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Seven Modern Plagues

Seven Modern Plagues

Learn how today's plagues first developed and discover patterns that could help prevent the diseases of tomorrow.

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Evolution in a Toxic World

Evolution in a Toxic World

A groundbreaking approach to understanding toxics and health.

The Australian Society of Microbiology

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